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These videos illustrate how the Peli Lensô shifts the upper and lower portion of the image from the patientís blind side into their unimpaired field of vision.† While this monocular view would be disorienting on itís own, the other lens of the glasses provides an unaltered image centrally that helps to anchor the wearer spatially.

 

The background voices are rehabilitation instructors describing the visual effects of the glasses and instructions to the patient.

 

What to look for while viewing the videoís:

 

 UNOBSTRUCTED CENTAL VISION

 IMAGE SHIFT AT TOP

 IMAGE SHIFT AT BOTTOM

 BOTTOM VIEW OF OBSTACLE

 

Video #21

The upper 1/3rd of this slide is covered by the Peli prism.† Listen to the man in the pink shirt instructing the patient.† The pink shirt manís upper body is seen first through the prism.† The patient turns his head to the left, then raises his head to view the man through the prism-free portion of the lens.†† Click here to view.

 

Video #24

The lower 1/4 and the upper 1/8th portion of this slide are covered by the Peli prisms.† A man in a pink shirt will enter from the left.† His feet will be viewed in the lower 1/4 portion and his head in the upper 1/8th portion (the Peli prisms).† His body will then come into view in the middle of the screen; the prism-free center of the lens.† The prisms detect images or obstacles 20 degrees into the blind side and give the patient early warning that something is coming.† The prisms create artificial peripheral vision.Click here to view.

 

Video #18

The portion of this slide covered by the Peli prisms is the upper 1/3rd and the lower 1/8th.† The prism-free central area covers a hallway and objects to the right of the hallway.† The prism portion (upper 1/3rd and lower 1/8th) allows viewing of the left wall of the hallway which is the patientís blind field.Click here to view.

 

Videos courtesy of:

Casey Suckow-Zinn, OD, Steve Rinne, MA Central Blind Rehabilitation Center, Hines VA Hospital.† Produced through resources of VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Grant #C3457 awarded to Joan Stelmack, OD, MPH.

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